Wednesday, March 29, 2006

"Street car named Desire" movie vs. book

I really enjoyed reading, “A Streetcar Named Desire” by Tennessee

Williams. I felt that the characters that Williams presented were very strong and the story was very backwards, just like a lot of the other literature we’ve been reading. When reading this I was able to see how Blanche represented the South, and how Stella and especially Stanley in a way represented the, “New American Man and Woman.” Stanley represented the, “mans-man” and his character was very masculine. I feel that this story also represented the change in society from agriculture and plantation life to a more industrial life style. The way Blanche lived on Belle Reve was much different than how Stella and Stanley lived in New Orleans, but Belle Reve was gone and the, “Old way of life” was also slowly fading. I feel that this story was a great depiction of how the South’s transformation away from the plantation life affected the people.
I felt that the movie captured even more of the interesting details about the story and displayed them for you. I felt that (Marlon Brando) Stanley was way hotter in the movie, and in the movie he is the epitome of a sexy man. I felt that the way he was wearing a tight shirt or sweating really illustrated how masculine he was, and was much different than the southern, “Gentleman” type. In the movie I felt that the characters obviously are able to embody more of their characteristics and show them. For example in the movie, Blanch had so many facial expressions, and she always spoke in a southern soft-spoken voice. Stella in the movie was very affectionate toward Stanley, and you could see by her looks at him and her body language that she was in love with him. At times I also found it interesting to see how aggressive Stella herself could be. In the movie she pushed and screamed at Stanley a lot. The movie just illustrated in pure sight the aggressive relationship between Stanley and Stella. One that involved passion and, “desire.”
It was a little strange that the movie cut out the homosexuality issue regarding Blanche’s first husband, but that is Hollywood for you. In the movie they also censor swear words and soften the rape scene involving Stanley and Blanche. In class we also discussed how in the movie we are able to see the steam from the train, and this really helps to add to the representation of the New Orleans lifestyle.
All in all I really enjoyed this story, and enjoy even more watching the movie. I think that every girl in the class can agree with me that this was a love story more than anything, and that’s something we’re always drawn to. Looking past the bad stuff, it was touching in a way to see how Stella was infatuated and in love with Stanley. Plus Marlon Brando is so hot!!

4 Comments:

Blogger Julie said...

I have to agree with you about Brando! It's interesting how the film turned up his sexuality even more, but downplayed other racy subjects. Seeing sexuality and talking about it are two different things, and in the film they can act sexual, but if they don't speak about it, it's not as bad. You made a good point about Stella being more physical. I also thought she looked very seductive on her way down the stairs after the "STELLAHHH" scene, and she wasn't really described in the play. I'm glad Hollywood didn't change too much of the story, even though changing things up a bit does add and take away certain elements.

7:34 PM  
Blogger brian said...

Well... I don't have the same thoughts as you about Brando.lol. but I did notice how the movie tried to show off his sexualty in order to downplay other aspects of him.

2:32 PM  
Blogger Tina said...

you made an important connection between stanley and stella living in new orleans and how blanche used to live on belle reve and now it was gone..and the connection that it represented the "old way of life..." being transformed into the new one.
i didnt even pick up on that! ive been thinking about it since i read your post, and it really makes sense...its like what blanche knew about everything while she was at belle reve..is what is slowing fading away from her...in reality it is gone, but in her mind it is still there, slowly fading away and she cant accept it.

8:25 PM  
Blogger LeAndra said...

I also thought it was off how they could turn up the sexuality in Stanley but softened or took out completely talk of it. I think they should have left in the fact about Blanches first husband being gay because it helps the audience understand more. I know that homosexuality was an unspoken thing then, but it makes the audience sympathize more with Blanche.

1:21 PM  

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